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  • A343 / RJ1H, Copenhagen Denmark, 2016 (Synopsis: On 26 December 2016, the wing of an Airbus A340-300 being repositioned by towing at Copenhagen as cleared hit an Avro RJ100 which had stopped short of its stand when taxiing due to the absence of the expected ground crew. The RJ100 had been there for twelve minutes at the time of the collision. The Investigation attributed the collision to differing expectations of the tug driver, the Apron controller and the RJ100 flight crew within an overall context of complacency on the part of the tug driver whilst carrying out what would have been regarded as a routine, non-stressful task.)
  • AN72, Sao Tome, Sao Tome & Principe, 2017 (Synopsis: On 29 July 2017, an Antonov AN-74 crew sighted several previously unseen large “eagles” rising from the long grass next to the runway as they accelerated for takeoff at Sao Tome and, concerned about the risk of ingestion, made a high speed rejected takeoff but were unable to stop on the runway and entered a deep ravine just beyond it which destroyed the aircraft. The Investigation found that the reject had been unnecessarily delayed until above V1, that the crew forgot to deploy the spoilers which would have significantly increased the stopping distance and that relevant crew training was inadequate.)
  • AS32 / B734, Aberdeen UK, 2000 (Synopsis: For reasons that were not established, a Super Puma helicopter being air tested and in the hover at about 30 feet agl near the active runway at Aberdeen assumed that the departure clearance given by GND was a take off clearance and moved into the hover over the opposite end of the runway at the same time as a Boeing 737 was taking off. The 737 saw the helicopter ahead and made a high speed rejected take off, stopping approximately 100 metres before reaching the position of the helicopter which had by then moved off the runway still hovering.)
  • AS3B, en-route, northern North Sea UK, 2008 (Synopsis: On 22 February 2008, a Eurocopter AS332 L2 Super Puma flying from an offshore oil platform to Aberdeen was struck by lightning. There was no apparent consequence and so, although this event required a landing as soon as possible, the commander decided to continue the remaining 165nm to the planned destination which was achieved uneventfully. Main rotor blade damage including some beyond repairable limits was subsequently discovered. The Investigation noted evidence indicating that this helicopter type had a relatively high propensity to sustain lightning strikes but noted that, despite the risk of damage, there was currently no adverse safety trend.)
  • AS3B, vicinity Den Helder Netherlands, 2006 (Synopsis: On 21 November 2006, the crew of a Bristow Eurocopter AS332 L2 making an unscheduled passenger flight from an offshore platform to Den Helder in night VMC decided to ditch their aircraft after apparent malfunction of an engine and the flight controls were perceived as rendering it unable to safely complete the flight. All 17 occupants survived but the evacuation was disorganised and both oversight of the operation by and the actions of the crew were considered to have been inappropriate in various respects. Despite extensive investigation, no technical fault which would have rendered it unflyable could be confirmed.)
  • AS55, vicinity Fairview Alberta Canada, 1999 (Synopsis: On 28th April 1999, an AS-355 helicopter suffered an in-flight fire attributed to an electrical fault which had originated from a prior maintenance error undetected during incomplete pre-flight inspections. The aircraft carried out an immediate landing allowing evacuation before the aircraft was destroyed by an intense fire.)
  • AT45, vicinity Prague Czech Republic, 2012 (Synopsis: On 31 October 2012, the crew of an ATR42 on a handover airworthiness function flight out of Prague briefly lost control in a full stall with significant wing drop after continuing a prescribed Stall Protection System (SPS) test below the appropriate speed and then failing to follow the correct stall recovery procedure. Failure of the attempted SPS test was subsequently attributed to both AOA vanes having become contaminated with water during earlier aircraft repainting at a specialist contractor and consequently being constrained in a constant position whilst the SPS test was being conducted at well above the prevailing freezing level.)
  • AT72, en-route, southern Scotland UK, 2011 (Synopsis: On 15 March 2011, an ATR 72-200 on a non revenue positioning flight from Edinburgh to Paris CDG in night VMC with just the two pilots on board began to experience roll and directional control difficulties as the aircraft accelerated upon reaching the planned cruise altitude of FL230. A ‘PAN’ call was made to ATC and a return to Edinburgh was made with successful containment of the malfunctioning flying controls.)
  • B190, vicinity Bebi south eastern Nigeria, 2008 (Synopsis: On 15 March 2008, a Beech 1900D on a non-revenue positioning flight to a private airstrip in mountainous terrain flown by an inadequately-briefed crew without sufficient guidance or previous relevant experience impacted terrain under power whilst trying to locate the destination visually after failing to respond to a series of GPWS Alerts and a final PULL UP Warning. Whilst attributing the accident to the crew, the Investigation also found a range of contributory deficiencies in respect of the Operator, official charting and ATS provision and additional deficiencies in the conduct of the unsuccessful SAR activity after the aircraft became overdue.)
  • B722 / BE10, Atlanta GA USA, 1990 (Synopsis: On 18 January 1990, a Boeing 727-200 landing at Atlanta at night and in good visibility in accordance with an unconditional clearance failed to see that a Beechcraft King Air, which had landed ahead of it, had yet to clear the runway. The 727 was unable to avoid a collision after a late sighting. The 727 sustained substantial damage and the King Air was destroyed. The Investigation attributed the collision to a combination of the failure of the runway controller to detect the lack of separation resulting from their issue of multiple landing clearances and the inadequacy of relevant ATC procedures.)
  • B733, vicinity Montpelier, France 2011 (Synopsis: On 10 January 2011, a Europe Airpost Boeing 737-300 taking off from Montpelier after repainting had just rotated for take off when the leading edge slats extended from the Intermediate position to the Fully Extended position and the left stick shaker was activated as a consequence of the reduced stalling angle of attack. Initial climb was sustained and soon afterwards, the slats returned to their previous position and the stick shaker activation stopped. The unexpected configuration change was attributed to paint contamination of the left angle of attack sensor, the context for which was inadequate task guidance.)
  • B734 / C172, vicinity Girona Spain, 2016 (Synopsis: On 28 September 2016, a Boeing 737-400 and a Cessna 172 both on IFR Flight Plans came into close proximity when about to turn final on the same non-precision approach at Girona from different initial joining routes. The Investigation found that two ACC sector controllers had issued conflicting approach clearances after losing situational awareness following a routine sector split due to an area ATC flow configuration change. The detection of the consequences of their error had then been hindered by a temporary area low level radar outage but helped by timely visual acquisition by both aircraft and a TCAS RA.)
  • B737 / B737, vicinity Geneva Switzerland, 2006 (Synopsis: On 11 May 2006, B737-700 taking off from Geneva came into close proximity with a Boeing Business Jet (BBJ) on a non revenue positioning flight which had commenced a go around from the same runway following an unstabilised approach. The Investigation attributed the conflict to the decision of ATC to give take off clearance to the departing aircraft when the approach of the inbound aircraft could have been seen as highly likely to result is a go around which would lead to proximity with the slower departing aircraft.)
  • B737, Singapore Seletar, 2017 (Synopsis: On 16 November 2017, a Boeing 737-700 departing Singapore Seletar was observed by ATC to only become airborne very near the end of the runway and to then climb only very slowly. Ten approach lights were subsequently found to have been impact-damaged by contact with the aircraft. The Investigation found that after the crew had failed to follow procedures requiring them to validate the FMC recalculation of modified takeoff performance data against independent calculations made on their EFBs, takeoff was made with reduced thrust instead of the full thrust required. The modification made was also found not to have been required.)
  • B737, Southend UK, 2010 (Synopsis: On 21 Nov 2010, a Boeing 737-700 being operated by Arik Air on a non revenue positioning flight from Southend to Lagos with only the two pilots on board carried out a successful take off in daylight and normal ground visibility from runway 06 but became airborne only just before the end of the runway.)
  • B737, manoeuvring, west of Norwich UK 2009 (Synopsis: On 12 January 2009, the flight crew of an Easyjet Boeing 737-700 on an airworthiness function flight out of Southend lost control of the aircraft during a planned system test. Controlled flight was only regained after an altitude loss of over 9000 ft, during which various exceedences of the AFM Flight Envelope occurred. The subsequent investigation found that the Aircraft Operators procedures for such flights were systemically flawed.)
  • B738 / DV20, vicinity Reus Spain, 2019 (Synopsis: On 12 May 2019, a Boeing 737-800 making its second procedural ILS approach to runway 25 at Reus came into conflict with an opposite direction light aircraft as the latter approached one of the designated VFR entry points having been instructed to remain well above the altitude which normally ensures separation of IFR and VFR traffic. The collision risk was resolved by TCAS RA promptly followed by the 737. The Investigation concluded that limiting the TWR radar display to the ATZ for controller training purposes had resulted in neither the trainee controller nor their supervisor being aware of the risk.)
  • B738 / E135, en-route, Mato Grosso Brazil, 2006 (Synopsis: On 29 September 2006, a Boeing 737-800 level at FL370 collided with an opposite direction Embraer Legacy at the same level. Control of the 737 was lost and it crashed, killing all 154 occupants. The Legacy's crew kept control and successfully diverted to the nearest suitable airport. The Investigation found that ATC had not instructed the Legacy to descend to FL360 when the flight plan indicated this and soon afterwards, its crew had inadvertently switched off their transponder. After the consequent disappearance of altitude from all radar displays, ATC assumed but did not confirm the aircraft had descended.)
  • B738, Dubai UAE, 2013 (Synopsis: On 6 December 2013, a Boeing 737-800 passenger aircraft was flown from Amman to Dubai out of revenue service with a quantity of 'live' boxed chemical oxygen generators on board as cargo without the awareness of the aircraft commander. The subsequent Investigation found that this was possible because of a wholesale failure of the aircraft operator to effectively oversee operational risk implicit in sub contracting heavy maintenance. As a result of the investigation, a previously unreported flight by the same operator in revenue service which had also carried live oxygen generators was disclosed.)
  • B743, vicinity Jeddah Saudia Arabia, 2008 (Synopsis: On 5 May 2008, a Saudi Arabian Boeing 747-300 being positioned for maintenance to include investigation of degraded power output from the no 1 GE CF6-50 engine experienced an uncontained failure of the same engine shortly after take off from Jeddah followed by an uneventful air turn back. The failure was attributed to the vulnerability of the engine design to high pressure turbine blade loss.)