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Designated Airworthiness Representative (DAR)

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Article Information
Category: Airworthiness Airworthiness
Content source: SKYbrary About SKYbrary
Content control: SKYbrary About SKYbrary
Publication Authority: SKYbrary SKYbrary

Background

The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) allows the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to leverage its resources through delegation. The law says that FAA may delegate to a qualified individual a matter relating or issuing certificates, or related to the examination, testing, and inspection necessary to issue a certificate on behalf of the FAA administrator.

An individual or an organization designated to act as a representative of the FAA administrator is known as a designee. Individual designees often are company employees who are authorized to act on behalf of the FAA only for their company. Other designees are independents who may work for any client.

Definition

FAA defines a designated airworthiness representative (DAR) as an individual, appointed in accordance with U.S. federal statutes, who may perform examination, inspection, and testing services necessary to the issuance of certificates.

Types of DARs

There are two types of DARs: manufacturing (DAR-F) and maintenance (DAR-T).

Manufacturing DARs perform many of the same functions as another category of designees known as designate manufacturing inspection representatives (DMIR) but work as individual consultants.

Maintenance DARs must hold a mechanic’s certificate with an airframe and powerplant (A&P) rating, OR a repairman certificate and be employed at a repair station certified under Part 145 of the federal regulations, or by an air carrier with an FAA-approved continuous airworthiness program.

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