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Aviation Safety Performance Reports and Statistics

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Revision as of 18:38, 24 July 2017 by Content.Manager (talk | contribs) (Data Boundaries)
Article Information
Category: Safety Management Safety Management
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Latest Published Statistical Summaries

Statistical Analysis of Commercial Aviation Accidents 1958-2016 - Airbus
Statistical Analysis of Commercial Aviation Accidents 1958-2016 - Airbus
Global Aviation Safety Study - Allianz
Global Aviation Safety Study - Allianz
Commercial Aviation accidents 1958-2015, a summary by Airbus
Commercial Aviation accidents 1958-2015, a summary by Airbus
ICAO 2016 Safety Review
ICAO 2016 Safety Report


Boeing: Statistical Summary of Commercial Jet Airplane Accidents 1959-2015
Boeing STATSUM 1959-2015, published in 2016.
EASA Annual Safety Review 2016
EASA Annual Safety Review: 2016
UK CAA CAP1036 Global Fatal Accident Review 2002-2011
UK CAA Global Fatal Accident Review 2002-2011
IATA Safety Report 2016
IATA Safety Report 2016

Description

Because of the volume and variable integrity of global aviation safety data, analysis of safety data usually involves establishing a taxonomy for the data set. Therefore, any interpretation of these analyses needs to be mindful of the taxonomy used. Comparison of similar analyses based on different taxonomies can sometimes be deceptive. For example, statistics provided by Boeing include accidents involving only Western Built commercial jets over 60,000 lb MTOW. Such statistics therefore include most large commercial jets but do not necessarily provide an insight into the safety performance of the wider aviation system. All of this means that when looking at statistics, it is important to know the taxonomies used.

Performance Reports and Statistical Taxonomies

Accident: ICAO defines an accident (link to accident article) as an occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft which takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight until such time as all such persons have disembarked in which: - A person is fatally or seriously injured - The aircraft sustains damage or structural failure - The aircraft is missing or is completely inaccessible

Note: The following are not considered accidents: experimental test flights, sabotage, hijacking, terrorism, or direct military action

There are several ways to classify an accident. These include classification by the level of damage incurred, by the extent of injuries caused, or by the cost of the damage to the aircraft. The following definitions are used in various classification taxonomies:

- Damage • Destroyed: The aircraft is not repairable, or, if repairable, the cost of repairs exceeds 50% of the cost of the aircraft when it was new • Substantial: Damage or failure that adversely affects the structural strength, performance, or flight characteristics of the aircraft, and which would normally require major repair or replacement of the affected component. Not considered in substantial damage are; engine failure or damage limited to an engine only, bent or dented skin, damage to landing gear (to include wheels and tires), flaps, or wingtips. • Minor: Damage that neither destroys the aircraft nor causes substantial damage.


- Injury • Fatal: An injury that results in death in the accident itself, or up to 30 days after the accident • Serious: An injury that requires more than 2 days of hospitalization up to 7 days after the accident. Fracture of any bone (except simple fractures of the toes, fingers, or nose). Serious also includes injury to an internal organ, any muscle or tendon damage, any second or third degree burn, or any burn covering more than 5 percent of the body. • Minor: An injury that requires less than 2 days of hospitalization up to 7 days after the accident.

Accident Classifications: Hull Loss Accident: An accident in which the aircraft damage is not repairable, or is damaged but not repaired. Hull loss accidents include when the aircraft is missing, or if the wreckage is inaccessible. Major Accident: An accident in which any of the following three conditions are met: - The aircraft is destroyed - There were multiple fatalities - There was one fatality and the aircraft sustained substantial damage Fatal Accident: An accident causing one or more fatalities to occupants of the aircraft Substantial Damage Accident: An accident in which the aircraft sustained substantial damage Serious Accident: An accident in which either of the following two conditions are met: - A single fatality without substantial damage - At least one serious injury and aircraft substantially damaged Minor Accident: An accident in which the aircraft sustained minor damage Aircraft incident: An occurrence other than an accident that affects or could affect the safety of operations

Related Article Accident Classification

Sources of Statistical Information



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