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  • B773, Dhaka Bangladesh, 2016 (Synopsis: On 7 June 2016, a GE90-115B engined Boeing 777-300 made a high speed rejected takeoff on 3200 metre-long runway 14 at Dhaka after right engine failure was annunciated at 149KCAS - just below V1. Neither crew nor ATC requested a runway inspection and 12 further aircraft movements occurred before it was closed for inspection and recovery of 14 kg of debris. The Investigation found that engine failure had followed Super Absorbent Polymer (SAP) contamination of some of the fuel nozzle valves which caused them to malfunction leading to Low Pressure Turbine (LPT) mechanical damage. The contaminant origin was not identified.)
  • B773, Tokyo Japan, 2016 (Synopsis: On 27 May 2016, a Boeing 777-300 crew made a high speed rejected take off when departing from Tokyo after a number one engine failure warning was quickly followed by a fire warning for the same engine and ATC advice of fire visible. As the fire warning continued with the aircraft stopped, an emergency evacuation was ordered. The Investigation found that the engine failure and fire had occurred when the 1st stage disc of the High Pressure Turbine had suddenly failed as result of undetected fatigue cracking which had propagated from an undetected disc manufacturing fault.)
  • B773, vicinity Toronto Canada, 2012 (Synopsis: On 28 May 2012 a GE90-powered Air Canada Boeing 777-300ER experienced sudden failure of the right engine during the initial climb after take off. There were no indications of associated engine fire and the failed engine was secured, fuel jettisoned and a return to land made. The Investigation found that the failure was related to a known manufacturing defect which was being controlled by repetitive boroscope inspections, the most recent of which was suspected not to have identified deterioration in the affected part of the engine.)
  • DC10, Sioux City USA, 1989 (Synopsis: On 19 July 1989, a GE CF6-6D-powered Douglas DC-10-10 at FL370 suffered a sudden explosive failure of the tail-mounted number 2 engine and a complete loss of hydraulics so that the aircraft could only be controlled by varying thrust on the remaining two engines. With only limited flightpath control, the subsequent Sioux City emergency landing led to the destruction of the aircraft by impact and fire. The Investigation attributed the engine failure to non-identification of a fan disc fatigue crack arising from a manufacturing defect and the loss of hydraulics to debris dispersal which had exceeded the system’s certification protection.)
  • DH8C, Darwin NT Australia, 2019 (Synopsis: On 11 November 2019, one of the two PW100 series engines of a Bombardier DHC8-300 failed catastrophically when takeoff power was set prior to brake release. The Investigation found that the power turbine shaft had fractured in two places and all first and second stage power turbine blades had separated from their disks. The shaft failure was found to have been caused by fatigue cracking initiated by corrosion pitting which was assessed as probably the result of prolonged marine low-altitude operations by the aircraft. It was found that this fatigue cracking could increase undetected during service between scheduled inspections.)
  • IL76, vicinity Karachi Pakistan, 2010 (Synopsis: On 27 November 2010, collateral damage to the wing of an IL-76 in the vicinity of an uncontained engine failure, which occurred soon after take-off from Karachi, led to fuel in that wing igniting. Descent from a maximum height of 600 feet occurred accompanied by a steadily increasing right bank. Just under a minute after take-off ground impact occurred and impact forces and fire destroyed the aircraft. The Investigation concluded that the engine failure was attributable to component fatigue in the LP compressor and that it would have been impossible for the crew to retain control.)