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BAE SYSTEMS Nimrod

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NIM
Aircraft
Name Nimrod
Manufacturer BAE SYSTEMS
Body Narrow
Wing Fixed Wing
Position Low wing
Tail Regular tail, low set
WTC Medium
APC D
Type code L4J
Engine Jet
Engine count Multi
Position (Front) Wing leading mounted
Landing gear Tricycle retractable
Mass group 4


Manufacturered as:

BAE SYSTEMS Nimrod
BRITISH AEROSPACE Nimrod
HAWKER SIDDELEY Nimrod


BAE SYSTEMS Nimrod

BAE SYSTEMS Nimrod BAE SYSTEMS Nimrod 3D

Description

Maritime patrol and ELINT aircraft. In service from 1969 to 2011. Initially developed for Royal Air Force as a replacement for the Avro Shackleton maritime patrol aircraft and based on the De Havilland Comet 4 airliner. Various upgraded versions with various mission capabilities were progressively introduced.

Technical Data

Wing span 35.00 m114.829 ft
Length 38.63 m126.739 ft
Height 9.08 m29.79 ft
Powerplant Variants:
  • 4 x 55.15kN R-R RB 168-20 Spey Mk 250 turbofans.
  • 2000: 4 x 66,3kN BMW R-R BR710 turbofans.
Engine model Rolls-Royce BR700, Rolls-Royce Spey

Performance Data

Take-Off Initial Climb
(to 5000 ft)
Initial Climb
(to FL150)
Initial Climb
(to FL240)
MACH Climb Cruise Initial Descent
(to FL240)
Descent
(to FL100)
Descent (FL100
& below)
Approach
V2 (IAS) kts IAS kts IAS kts IAS kts MACH TAS 475 kts MACH IAS kts IAS kts Vapp (IAS) kts
Distance 1463 m ROC ft/min ROC ft/min ROC ft/min ROC ft/min MACH ROD ft/min ROD ft/min MCS kts Distance 1615 m
MTOW 8051080,510 kg
80.51 tonnes
kg
Ceiling FL420 ROD ft/min APC D
WTC M Range 57555,755 nm
10,658,260 m
10,658.26 km
34,968,044.645 ft
NM

Accidents & Serious Incidents involving NIM

  • NIM / AS32, vicinity RAF Kinloss UK, 2006 (On 17 October 2006, at night, in low cloud and poor visibility conditions in the vicinity of Kinloss Airfield UK, a loss of separation event occurred between an RAF Nimrod MR2 aircraft and a civilian AS332L Puma helicopter.)
  • NIM, manoeuvring, northern North Sea UK, 1995 (On 16 May 1995, an RAF BAe Nimrod on an airworthiness function flight caught fire after an electrical short circuit led indirectly to the No 4 engine starter turbine disc being liberated and breaching the No 2 fuel tank. It was concluded by the Investigation that the leaking fuel had then been ignited by either the electrical arcing or the heat of the adjacent engine. After the fire spread rapidly, the risk of structural break up led the commander to ditch the aircraft whilst it was still controllable. This was successful and all seven occupants were rescued.)
  • NIM, vicinity Kandahar Afghanistan, 2006 (On 2 September 2006, a UK Royal Air Force (RAF) Nimrod, engaged in operations over Afghanistan experienced a fuel-fed bomb bay fire shortly after completing air-to-air refuelling. The fire spread and the aircraft exploded in flight before the crew were able to land at Kandahar. The Investigation concluded that the fuel leak had been the result of a series of systemic failures to ensure continued airworthiness of the aircraft type.)