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EMBRAER Xingu

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E121
Aircraft
Name Xingu
Manufacturer EMBRAER
Body Narrow
Wing Fixed Wing
Position Low wing
Tail T-tail
WTC Light
APC B
Type code L2T
Engine Turboprop
Engine count Multi
Position On wing mounted, pusher propellers
Landing gear Tricycle retractable
Mass group 2


Manufacturered as:

EMBRAER VU-9 Xingu
EMBRAER Xingu
EMBRAER EC-9 Xingu
EMBRAER EMB-121 Xingu


EMBRAER Xingu

EMBRAER Xingu

Description

Liaison and trainer aircraft. In service since 1977. Coupled EMB-110 Bandeirante wings and engines with a new fuselage. The major customer was the French Armée de l'Air. Several derivations, including the EMB-120 Brasilia as regional airliner and the EMB-123 Tapajós. Last development EMB-121B Xingu 2 with more powerful engines, more seat capacity, stretched fuselage and wing span. Production ceased in 1987 after 105 aircraft were built. EMB-121B Xingu 2: Wing span 14,83 m MTOW 6,140kg13,536.383 lbs
6.14 tonnes
.

Technical Data

Wing span 14.45 m47.408 ft
Length 12.25 m40.19 ft
Height 4.74 m15.551 ft
Powerplant Xingu 1: 2 x 680 SHP PWC PT6A-28 turboprops with 3 blade propellers.

Xingu 2: 2 x 850 SHP PWC PT6A-42 turboprops with 4 blade propellers.

Engine model

Performance Data

Take-Off Initial Climb
(to 5000 ft)
Initial Climb
(to FL150)
Initial Climb
(to FL240)
MACH Climb Cruise Initial Descent
(to FL240)
Descent
(to FL100)
Descent (FL100
& below)
Approach
V2 (IAS) kts IAS kts IAS kts IAS kts MACH TAS 243 kts MACH IAS kts IAS kts Vapp (IAS) kts
Distance 865 m ROC 1400 ft/min ROC ft/min ROC ft/min ROC ft/min MACH ROD ft/min ROD ft/min MCS kts Distance 850 m
MTOW 56705,670 kg
5.67 tonnes
kg
Ceiling FL260 ROD ft/min APC B
WTC L Range 12701,270 nm
2,352,040 m
2,352.04 km
7,716,666.672 ft
NM

Accidents & Serious Incidents involving E121

  • Vehicle / E190 / E121, Jersey Channel Islands, 2010 (On 1 June 2010, an Airport RFFS bird scaring vehicle entered the active runway at Jersey in LVP without clearance and remained there for approximately three minutes until ATC became aware. The subsequent Investigation found that the incursion had fortuitously occurred just after an ERJ 190 had landed and had been terminated just as another aircraft had commenced a go around after failure to acquire the prescribed visual reference required to continue to a landing. The context for the failure of the vehicle driver to follow existing procedures was found to be their inadequacy and appropriate changes were implemented.)