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MCDONNELL DOUGLAS DC-10

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DC10
Aircraft
Name DC-10
Manufacturer MCDONNELL DOUGLAS
Body Narrow
Wing Fixed Wing
Position Low wing
Tail Regular tail, mid set
WTC Heavy
APC C
Type code L3J
RFF Category 8
Engine Jet
Engine count Multi
Position Underwing mounted and fin-integrated
Landing gear Tricycle retractable
Mass group 4


Manufacturered as:

BOEING MD-10
MCDONNELL DOUGLAS MD-10
MCDONNELL DOUGLAS KDC-10
MCDONNELL DOUGLAS Extender
MCDONNELL DOUGLAS DC-10
MCDONNELL DOUGLAS KC-10 Extender


MCDONNELL DOUGLAS DC-10

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS DC-10 MCDONNELL DOUGLAS DC-10 3D

Description

Long range airliner/freighter. In service since 1971. Tri jet development with the similar L-1001 TriStar. More powerful versions DC-10-30 and DC-10-40. Freighter version DC-10F, most common version today. KC-10 military tanker development. BOEING started a DC-10 modification program with MD-11 (two crew) cockpit. Production ceased 1989.

Technical Data

Wing span 50.4 m165.354 ft
Length 55 m180.446 ft
Height 17.7 m58.071 ft
Powerplant 10: 3 x GE CF6-6D (178 kN) or 3 x GE CF6-6D1 (182,4 kN) turbofans.

30: 3 x GE CF6-50A (218 kN) or 3 x GE CF6-50C (226,9 kN) or 3 x GE CF6-50C1/C2 (233,5 kN) or 3 x GE CF6-50C2 (240,2 kN) turbofans.
40: 3 x P&W (219,6 kN) or 3 x P&W JT9D-20 (219,6 kN) or 3 x P&W JT9D-59A (235,8 kN) turbofans.

Engine model General Electric CF6, Pratt & Whitney JT9D

Performance Data

Take-Off Initial Climb
(to 5000 ft)
Initial Climb
(to FL150)
Initial Climb
(to FL240)
MACH Climb Cruise Initial Descent
(to FL240)
Descent
(to FL100)
Descent (FL100
& below)
Approach
V2 (IAS) 150 kts IAS 180 kts IAS 290 kts IAS 290 kts MACH 0.8 TAS 510 kts MACH 0.81 IAS 300 kts IAS kts Vapp (IAS) 149 kts
Distance 3000 m ROC 2000 ft/min ROC 1500 ft/min ROC 1000 ft/min ROC 1000 ft/min MACH 0.82 ROD 1000 ft/min ROD 1500 ft/min MCS 230 kts Distance 1800 m
MTOW 259459259,459 kg
259.459 tonnes
kg
Ceiling FL410 ROD ft/min APC C
WTC H Range 62206,220 nm
11,519,440 m
11,519.44 km
37,793,438.348 ft
NM

Accidents & Serious Incidents involving DC10

  • DC10, Macau SAR China, 2005 (On 9 November 2005, a McDonnell Douglas DC10-30F almost failed to get airborne before the end of the runway on a night takeoff from Macau and its main landing gear then hit lighting and ILS equipment as it climbed at a very shallow angle. After flight, two wheel changes were required due to tyre damage. The Investigation was hindered by the failure of the State of the Operator to assist the Investigation but concluded that the aircraft had been correctly loaded and that the extended take off roll had been due to use of the wrong flap setting.)
  • DC10, Newburgh NY USA, 1996 (On 5 September 1996, a DC10 operated by Fedex, was destroyed by fire shortly after landing at Newburgh, USA, following a fire in the cargo compartment.)
  • DC10, Sioux City USA, 1989 (On 19 July 1989, a GE CF6-6D-powered Douglas DC-10-10 at FL370 suffered a sudden explosive failure of the tail-mounted number 2 engine and a complete loss of hydraulics so that the aircraft could only be controlled by varying thrust on the remaining two engines. With only limited flightpath control, the subsequent Sioux City emergency landing led to the destruction of the aircraft by impact and fire. The Investigation attributed the engine failure to non-identification of a fan disc fatigue crack arising from a manufacturing defect and the loss of hydraulics to debris dispersal which had exceeded the system’s certification protection.)
  • DC10, Tahiti French Polynesia, 2000 (On 24 December 2000, a Hawaiian Airlines DC10 overran the runway at Tahiti after landing long on a wet runway having encountered crosswinds and turbulence on approach in thunderstorms.)
  • DC10, en-route, Paris France, 1974 (On 3 March 1974, all 346 occupants were killed when a Turkish Airlines McDonnell Douglas DC 10 suffered an explosive decompression after an improperly secured hold door detached passing 12000ft in the climb shortly after departing Paris Orly. It was found that non-mandated corrective actions promulgated after the investigation into a similar DC10 explosive decompression in Canada nearly two years earlier had identified an identical fault in the door closure mechanism which had allowed it to indicate and appear secured when it was not had not been completed on the aircraft at the time of the accident.)