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BOEING 737-300

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B733
Aircraft
Name 737-300
Manufacturer BOEING
Body Narrow
Wing Fixed Wing
Position Low wing
Tail Regular tail, mid set
WTC Medium
APC C
Type code L2J
RFF Category 6
Engine Jet
Engine count Multi
Position Underwing mounted
Landing gear Tricycle retractable
Mass group 4


Manufacturered as:

BOEING 737-300


BOEING 737-300

BOEING 737-300 BOEING 737-300 3D

Description

Short range airliner. In service since 1984. Initial member of second generation of Boeings B737 family (also named classic) with more powerful high bypass engines and improved aerodynamics. In order to secure ground clearance the CFM56 engines have flattened undersides. Stretched version 737-400 and shorter version 737-500. Production ceased in 1999 (2000 for the 400 model).

For more information, see Boeing's B737 family specifications.

Technical Data

Wing span 28.9 m94.816 ft
Length 33.44 m109.711 ft
Height 11.1 m36.417 ft
Powerplant 2 x CFM56-3B1 (90 kN) or

2 x CFM56-3B2 (99 kN) turbofans.

Engine model CFM International CFM56

Performance Data

Take-Off Initial Climb
(to 5000 ft)
Initial Climb
(to FL150)
Initial Climb
(to FL240)
MACH Climb Cruise Initial Descent
(to FL240)
Descent
(to FL100)
Descent (FL100
& below)
Approach
V2 (IAS) 140 kts IAS 165 kts IAS 270 kts IAS 270 kts MACH 0.70 TAS 429 kts MACH 0.70 IAS 270 kts IAS 220 kts Vapp (IAS) 130 kts
Distance 1600 m ROC 2500 ft/min ROC 2000 ft/min ROC 1400 ft/min ROC 1000 ft/min MACH 0.745 ROD 800 ft/min ROD 3500 ft/min MCS 210 kts Distance 1400 m
MTOW 5647056,470 kg
56.47 tonnes
kg
Ceiling FL370 ROD 1500 ft/min APC C
WTC M Range 16001,600 nm
2,963,200 m
2,963.2 km
9,721,784.784 ft
NM

Accidents & Serious Incidents involving B733

  • A319/B733, en-route, near Moutiers France, 2010 (On 8 July 2010 an Easyjet Airbus A319 on which line training was being conducted mis-set a descent level despite correctly reading it back and, after subsequently failing to notice an ATC re-iteration of the same cleared level, continued descent to 1000 feet below it in day VMC and into conflict with crossing traffic at that level, a Boeing 737. The 737 received and actioned a TCAS RA ‘CLIMB’ and the A319, which received on a TCAS TA, was given an emergency turn by ATC. The recorded CPA was 2.2 nm and 125 feet.)
  • AT45 / B733, Munich Germany, 2004 (During the hours of darkness at Munich on 3 May 2004, an ATR42-500 was given a conditional line up clearance for Runway 08R but contrary to this clearance then taxied onto that runway as a Boeing 737-300 was landing on it. The landing aircraft missed the right wingtip of the ATR-42, which continued taxing onto the runway as it approached, by “a few metres”.)
  • B733 / B744, Chicago IL USA, 2006 (On 23 July 2006, a Boeing B737-300 operated by United Airlines executed an early rotation during a night take off when a Boeing 747 operated by Atlas Air was observed on a landing roll on an intersecting runway at Chicago O’Hare Airport. The occurrence is attributed to ATC error.)
  • B733 / DH8D, Fort McMurray Canada, 2014 (On 4 August 2014, a Boeing 737-300 making a day visual approach at Fort McMurray after receiving an ILS/DME clearance lined up on a recently-constructed parallel taxiway and its crew were only alerted to their error shortly before touchdown by the crew of a DHC8-400 which was taxiing along the same taxiway in the opposite direction. This resulted in a go around being commenced from 46 feet agl. The Investigation noted that both pilots had been looking out during the final stages of the approach and had ignored important SOPs including that for a mandatory go around from an unstable approach.)
  • B733 / SW4, Los Angeles CA USA, 1991 (On 1 February 1991, a Boeing 737-300 had just made a normal visibility night touchdown on Los Angeles runway 24L in accordance with its clearance when its crew saw another aircraft stationary ahead of them on the same runway. Avoidance was impossible in the time available and a high speed collision and post-impact fire destroyed both aircraft and killed 34 of their 101 occupants and injured 30 others. The other aircraft was subsequently found to have been a Fairchild Metroliner cleared to line up and wait by the same controller who had then cleared the 737 to land.)
  • B733 / vehicle, Amsterdam Netherlands, 2010 (On 18 December 2010, the ATC Runway Controller responsible for runway 24 at Amsterdam gave a daylight take off clearance in normal visibility to a Norwegian Boeing 737-300 whilst a bird control vehicle which they had earlier given clearance to enter the runway was still on it. The departing aircraft overflew the vehicle without noticing it. The subsequent investigation highlighted significant differences between the procedures for active runway access at Amsterdam and corresponding international practice as well as finding that integrated safety investigation and overall safety management at the airport were systemically ineffective.)
  • B733, Amsterdam Netherlands, 2010 (On 10 February 2010 a KLM Boeing 737-300 unintentionally made a night take off from Amsterdam in good visibility from the taxiway parallel to the runway for which take off clearance had been given. Because of the available distance and the absence of obstructions, the take off was otherwise uneventful. The Investigation noted the familiarity of the crew with the airport and identified apparent complacency.)
  • B733, Birmingham UK, 2009 (On 6 February 2009, the crew of a Boeing 737-300 departing Birmingham successfully rejected take off from well above V1 when it became clear to the First Officer as handling pilot, that it was impossible to rotate. The Investigation found that cause of the rotation difficulty was that the crew had failed to set the stabiliser trim to the appropriate position for take off after delaying this action beyond the normal point in pre flight preparations because ground de icing was in progress and not subsequently noticing.)
  • B733, Birmingham UK, 2012 (On 21 September 2012, an Aurela Boeing 737-300 lost directional control and left the paved surface when attempting to turn off the landing runway at Birmingham expeditiously to avoid the following aircraft having to go around. The Investigation noted that the range of the approaching aircraft - still 2.5nm as the incident aircraft began to clear the runway - had not been communicated and concluded that the speed of the aircraft had been inappropriate for the prevailing wet surface conditions as well as unnecessary to prevent a go around by the following aircraft.)
  • B733, Burbank CA USA, 2000 (On 5 March 2000, a Boeing 737-300 being operated by Southwest Airlines on a scheduled passenger flight from Las Vegas to Burbank overran the landing destination runway in normal day visibility after a steep visual approach had been flown at an abnormally high speed. The aircraft exited the airport perimeter and came to a stop on a city street near a gas station. An emergency evacuation of the 142 occupants led to 2 serious injuries and 42 minor injuries and the aircraft was extensively damaged.)
  • B733, Chambery France, 2012 (On 14 April 2012, a Titan Airways Boeing 737-300 attempted to take off from Chambery with incorrect reference speeds taken from the EFB used for performance calculations. As a consequence, the pressure hull was damaged by a tail strike during take off, although not sufficiently to affect cabin pressure during the subsequent flight. The Investigation concluded that the accident raised regulatory issues in respect of the general design and use of EFB computers to calculate performance data.)
  • B733, Nottingham East Midlands, UK 2006 (On 15 June 2006 a TNT Belgium-operated Boeing 737-300 on diversion to East Midlands because of poor destination weather made an unintended ground contact 90 metres to one side of the intended landing runway whilst attempting to initiate a go around after a mis-flown daylight Cat 3A ILS approach. The RH MLG assembly broke off before the aircraft left the ground again and climbed away after which it was then flown to nearby Birmingham for a successful emergency landing. The subsequent investigation attributed the poor aircraft management which led to the accident to pilot distraction.)
  • B733, Paris CDG France, 2011 (On 23 July 2011, a Boeing 737-300 being operated by Jet2.com on a passenger flight from Leeds/Bradford to Paris CDG experienced violent vibration from the main landing gear at touch down in normal day visibility on runway 27R at a normal speed off a stabilised approach. This vibration was accompanied by lateral acceleration that made directional control difficult but the aircraft was kept on the runway and at a speed of 75 knots, the vibrations abruptly stopped. Once clear of the runway, the aircraft was stopped and the engines shutdown prior to a tow to the gate. None of the 133 occupants were injured.)
  • B733, Tabing Padang Indonesia, 2012 (On 13 October 2012, the crew of a Boeing 737-300 destined for the new Padang airport at Minangkabau inadvertently landed their aircraft on runway 34 at the old Padang Airport at Tabing which has a similarly-aligned runway. The Investigation found that the Captain disregarded ILS indications for the correct approach after visually acquiring the similarly aligned runway when the correct runway was not also in sight. Since the chosen runway was some 6 miles ahead of the intended one, a high descent rate achieved through sideslip, followed with this unstable approach, continued to an otherwise uneventful landing.)
  • B733, Yogyakarta Indonesia, 2011 (On 20 December 2011, the experienced Captain of a Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737-300 flew an unstabilised non-precision approach to a touchdown at Yogyakarta at excessive speed whilst accompanied by a very inexperienced First Officer. The aircraft overran the end of the 2200 metre-long wet runway by 75 metres . During the approach, the Captain 'noticed' several GPWS PULL UP Warnings but no action was taken. The Investigation attributed the accident entirely to the actions of the flight crew and found that there had been no alert calls from the First Officer in respect of the way the approach was flown.)
  • B733, en-route, Santa Barbara CA USA, 1999 (On 2 September 1999, a United Airlines Boeing Boeing 737-300 in the cruise at FL240, experienced severe turbulence due to an encounter with the wake vortex from a preceding MD11 on a similar track which had climbed through the level of the B737 with minimum lateral separation, 1.5 minutes earlier.)
  • B733, en-route, north of Antalya Turkey, 2009 (On 2 May 2009, a Boeing 737-300 being operated by French airline Europe Airpost on a passenger charter flight from Marseille to Antalya, Turkey was descending in day VMC towards destination when a sudden and severe turbulence encounter led to a temporary loss of control and stall. Recovery was achieved and none of the 115 occupants was injured and the aircraft was undamaged.)
  • B733, en-route, north of Yuma AZ USA, 2011 (On 1 April 2011, a Southwest Boeing 737-300 climbing through FL340 experienced a sudden loss of pressurisation as a section of fuselage crown skin ruptured. A successful emergency descent was made with a diversion to Yuma, where the aircraft landed half an hour later. Investigation found that the cause of the failure was an undetected manufacturing fault in the 15 year-old aircraft. One member of the cabin crew and an off duty staff member who tried to assist him became temporarily unconscious after disregarding training predicated on the time of useful consciousness after sudden depressurisation.)
  • B733, en-route, northwest of Athens Greece, 2005 (On 14 August 2005, a Boeing 737-300 was released to service with the cabin pressurisation set to manual. This abnormal setting was not detected by the flight crew involved during standard checks. They took no corrective action after take-off when a cabin high altitude warning occurred. The crew lost consciousness as the aircraft climbed on autopilot and after eventual fuel exhaustion, the aircraft departed controlled flight and impacted terrain. The Investigation found that inadequate crew performance had occurred within a context of systemic organisational safety deficiencies at the Operator compounded by inadequate regulatory oversight.)
  • B733, vicinity Belfast Aldergrove UK, 2006 (On 18 July 2006, a Boeing 737-300 being operated by a Spanish Airline commenced a daylight non precision approach with a 12 degree offset FAT towards Belfast Aldergrove but then made an unstable descent to 200 feet agl towards an unlicensed runway at a different airport before being told by ATC radar to go around. A further also unstable approach to the correct airport/runway followed. The Investigation noted that there were multiple cues indicating that an approach to the wrong airport was being made and was not able to establish any reason why two successive unstable approaches were not discontinued)
  • B733, vicinity Bournemouth UK, 2007 (On 23 September 2007, the pilots of a Thomsonfly Boeing 737-300 almost lost control of their aircraft after initiating a go around from an unstable low airspeed and low thrust condition reached progressively but unnoticed during an approach to Bournemouth at night. Mismanagement of the aircraft during the go around was attributed to a lack of adequate understanding of the aircraft pitch control system and led to extreme pitch and an aerodynamic stall but the crew subsequently recovered control of the aircraft and an uneventful second approach and normal landing followed.)
  • B733, vicinity Chambery France, 2010 (On 7 February 2010, a Boeing 737-300 being operated by Jet2 on a scheduled passenger flight from Leeds/Bradford UK to Chambery France was making an ILS approach to runway 18 at destination in day IMC when a Mode 2 EGPWS ‘Terrain, Pull Up’ Warning occurred. A climb was immediately initiated to VMC on top and a second ILS approach was then made uneventfully. Despite extreme pitch during the early stages of the pull up climb, none if the 109 occupants, all secured for landing, were injured.)
  • B733, vicinity Helsinki Finland, 2008 (On 26 March 2008, a Ukraine International Airlines’ Boeing 737-300 being vectored by ATC to the ILS at destination Helsinki in IMC descended below its cleared altitude and came close to a telecommunications mast. ATC noticed the deviation and instructed a climb. The investigation attributed the non-compliance with the accepted descent clearance to the failure of the flight crew to operate in accordance with SOPs. It was also noted that the way in which ATC safety systems were installed and configured at the time of the occurrence had precluded earlier ATC awareness of the hazard caused by the altitude deviation.)
  • B733, vicinity Manchester UK, 1997 (On 1 August 1997, an Air Malta B737, descending for an approach into Manchester UK in poor weather, descended significantly below the cleared and correctly acknowledged altitude, below MSA.)
  • B733, vicinity Montpelier, France 2011 (On 10 January 2011, a Europe Airpost Boeing 737-300 taking off from Montpelier after repainting had just rotated for take off when the leading edge slats extended from the Intermediate position to the Fully Extended position and the left stick shaker was activated as a consequence of the reduced stalling angle of attack. Initial climb was sustained and soon afterwards, the slats returned to their previous position and the stick shaker activation stopped. The unexpected configuration change was attributed to paint contamination of the left angle of attack sensor, the context for which was inadequate task guidance.)
  • B733, vicinity Pittsburg PA USA, 1994 (On 8 September 1994, a US Air Boeing 737-300 crashed near Pittsburg USA following loss of control attributed to a rudder malfunction.)
  • B733, vicinity Sharm El-Sheikh Egypt, 2004 (On 3 January 3 2004, a Boeing 737-300 being operated by Flash Airlines on a passenger charter flight from Sharm el-Sheikh Egypt to Cairo for a refuelling stop en route to Paris CDG crashed into the sea 2½ minutes after a night take off into VMC and was destroyed and all 148 occupants killed. The Investigation was unable to establish a Probable Cause but found evidence of AP status confusion and the possibility of distraction leading to insufficient attention being paid to flight path control.)
  • B735/B733, Dallas-Fort Worth TX USA, 2001 (On 16 August 2001, a Continental Boeing 737-500 which had just landed on runway 18R at Dallas-Fort-Worth crossed runway 18L in daylight in front of a Delta Boeing 737-300 which had originally been believed to be holding position but was then seen to be taking off from the same runway. The Delta aircraft rotated early and sharply to overfly the crossing aircraft and suffered a tail strike in doing so. Clearance was estimated to have been about 100 feet. Both aircraft were being operated in accordance with valid ATC clearances issued by the same controller.)
  • B738, Knock Ireland, 2009 (On 19 October 2009, a Boeing 737-300 being operated by British Midland subsidiary bmibaby on a scheduled passenger flight from Knock (also more recently known as ‘Ireland West’) to Manchester encountered a large flock of medium-sized birds during rotation for take off in normal day visibility and engine malfunction followed. Increasing engine vibration during the climb led to the decision to divert to Shannon, which was completed without further event. There were no injuries to the 133 occupants or anyone on the ground.)
  • B773, Dubai UAE, 2016 (On 3 August 2016 the crew of a Boeing 777-300 rejected a landing at Dubai after a touchdown beyond the TDZ was followed by an automated 'LONG LANDING' Advisory Callout. Four seconds later, the aircraft became airborne again but with the thrust at Idle, it reached approximately 85 feet above the runway before sinking back onto it and impacting rear fuselage first at 900 fpm. The right engine-pylon assembly detached and an intense fuel-fed fire started as the aircraft came to a stop and it was quickly destroyed by impact and fire. All 300 occupants escaped, 23 with minor injuries.)