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Accident and Serious Incident Reports: GND

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Article Information
Category: Ground Operations Ground Operations
Content source: SKYbrary About SKYbrary
Content control: EUROCONTROL EUROCONTROL

Definition

Reports relating to accidents associated with Ground Operations.

The accident reports are grouped together below in subcategories.

Dangerous Goods

  • DC93, en-route, Everglades FL USA, 1996 (GND FIRE LOC) (On 11 May 1996, fire, originating from incorrectly carried dangerous cargo, broke out on board a Valujet DC9. The fire damaged the aircraft flying controls before the crew were able to land the aircraft and it crashed in the Florida Everglades, USA.)
  • B742, Halifax Canada, 2004 (HF GND LOC FIRE) (On 14 October 2004, a B742 crashed on take off from Halifax International Airport, Canada, and was destroyed by impact forces and a post-crash fire. The crew had calculated incorrect V speeds and thrust setting using an EFB.)
  • B744, En-route, East China Sea, 2011 (FIRE LOC GND) (On 28 July 2011, an Asiana Boeing 747-400F reported main deck fire 50 minutes after take off from Incheon, South Korea. Eighteen minutes later whilst attempting to make an emergency diversion to Jeju, it became impossible to operate the flying controls and the aircraft crashed into the sea. The ongoing investigation is focusing on dangerous goods being carried which included lithium ion batteries.)


De-Icing/Anti-Icing of Aircraft on the Ground

  • B732, vicinity Washington National DC USA, 1982 (LOC HF WX GND) (On 13 January 1982, an Air Florida Boeing 737-200 took off in daylight from runway 36 at Washington National in moderate snow but then stalled before hitting a bridge and vehicles and continuing into the river below after just one minute of flight killing most of the occupants and some people on the ground. The accident was attributed entirely to a combination of the actions and inactions of the crew in relation to the prevailing adverse weather conditions and, crucially, to the failure to select engine anti ice on which led to over reading of actual engine thrust.)
  • B738/B763, Barcelona Spain, 2011 (GND HF) (On 14 April 2011, a Ryanair Boeing 737-800 failed to leave sufficient clearance when taxiing behind a stationary Boeing 767-300 at Barcelona and the 737 wingtip was in collision with the horizontal stabiliser of the 767, damaging both. The 767 crew were completely unaware of any impact but the 737 crew realised the ‘close proximity’ but dismissed a cabin crew report that a passenger had observed a collision. Both aircraft completed their intended flights without incident after which the damage was discovered, that to the 767 requiring that the aircraft be repaired before further flight.)
  • A343 / B744, London Heathrow UK, 2007 (GND HF) (On 15 October 2007, an Airbus 340-300 being operated on a scheduled passenger flight by Air Lanka with a heavy crew in the flight deck was taxiing towards the departure runway at London Heathrow at night in normal visibility when the right wing tip hit and sheared off the left hand winglet of a stationary British Airways Boeing 747-400 which was in a queue on an adjacent taxiway. The Airbus 340 sustained only minor damage to the right winglet and navigation light.)
  • E135, Norwich UK, 2003 (RE WX HF GND) (On 30 January 2003, an Embraer 135 being operated by Swedish company City Airline on a scheduled night passenger flight from Aberdeen to Norwich overran the slush-covered landing runway following a late touchdown in normal visibility. There were no injuries to any of the 25 occupants and with no signs of fire, the passengers subsequently disembarked via the aircraft integral airstairs. There was only minor damage to the aircraft landing gear which required wheel replacement.)
  • B733, Birmingham UK, 2009 (GND HF RE) (On the morning of 6 February 2009, a Boeing 737-300 being operated by bmibaby was departing from Birmingham for Edinburgh on a scheduled passenger flight and the crew had had the aircraft de-iced on the gate prior to departure. The stabiliser trim was not set at the usual time due to the ongoing de-icing procedure and the omission was not noticed after start because the crew became preoccupied with the flap setting. The aircraft started its takeoff run with the incorrect stabiliser trim setting and the First Officer, the designated PF, was subsequently unable to raise the aircraft nose at VR. The Captain then decided to reject the takeoff. The thrust levers were closed at 155 kts, considerably in excess of V1, and the aircraft stopped on the runway without further incident.)
  • … further results

"Ground de/anti icing" is not in the list of possible values (Taxiway collision, On gate collision, Aircraft / Aircraft conflict, Aircraft / Person conflict, Aircraft / Vehicle conflict, Aircraft / Object or Structure conflict, ATC clearance error, Ground de/anti icing ineffective, Ground de/anti icing not available, Failure to De/anti Ice, Jet Blast / Prop wash, Surface Friction, Towed aircraft involved, Aircraft Push Back, Incorrect Parking Position, Airbridge Positioning, Both objects moving, Wingtip clearance, Centreline obscured, Accepted ATC clearance not followed, Surface Lighting control, Hold Loading, Passenger Loading, Cargo Loading, Fuel Loading, Dangerous Goods, Engine Ground Running, Engine Powered Systems Test, No Flight Crew on Board, Charting Error) for this property.

Aircraft Push Back

  • JS41, Birmingham UK, 2007 (GND HF) (On 26 June 2007, at Birmingham Airport UK, a BAe Jetstream 41 started an engine running pushback without using intercom between ground crew and flight crew. The pushback could not be completed as the towbar could not be disconnected and confusion over a decision to return the aircraft to the gate resulted in an attempt to do so with the aircraft brakes selected which caused the aircraft nose landing gear to collapse.)
  • B735, Newark NJ USA, 2006 (GND) (On 21 August 2006, a Boeing 737-500 suffered a nose landing gear collapse during towing at the Newark Liberty International Airport. A technical crew was repositioning the aircraft in visual meteorological conditions during the occurrence. No persons were injured and minor aircraft damage occurred.)
  • RJ85 / RJ1H, London City Airport, London UK, 2008 (GND HF) (On 21 April 2008, an Avro RJ85 aircraft was parked on Stand 10 at London City Airport, with an Avro RJ100 parked to its left, on the adjacent Stand 11. After being repositioned by a tug, the RJ85 taxied forward and to the right, its tail contacting the tail of the RJ100 and causing minor damage to the RJ100’s right elevator.)
  • B738, London Stansted UK, 2008 (GND HF) (On 13 November 2008, a Boeing 737-800 with an unserviceable APU was being operated by Ryanair on a passenger flight at night was in collision with a tug after a cross-bleed engine start procedure was initiated prior to the completion of a complex aircraft pushback in rain. As the power was increased on the No 1 engine in preparation for the No 2 engine start, the resulting increase in thrust was greater than the counter-force provided by the tug and the aircraft started to move forwards. The towbar attachment failed and subsequently the aircraft’s No 1 engine impacted the side of the tug, prior to the aircraft brakes being applied.)
  • B752 / CRJ7, San Francisco CA USA, 2008 (GND HF) (On 13 January 2008, a Boeing 757-200 and a Bombardier CL-600 received pushback clearance from two adjacent terminal gates within 41 seconds. The ground controller believed there was room for both aircraft to pushback. During the procedure both aircraft were damaged as their tails collided. The pushback procedure of the Boeing was performed without wing-walkers or tail-walkers.)
  • … further results


Jet Blast/Prop Wash

  • B734, Aberdeen UK, 2005 (GND) (On 8 July 2005, a British Airways B737-400 departed Aberdeen, UK. On takeoff, sections of a blast pad at the runway threshold lifted and broke up causing damage to the aircraft's tailplane and elevator.)


Taxiway Collision

  • A321, Daegu South Korea, 2006 (GND HF) (On 21 February 2006, an Airbus A321-200 being operated by China Eastern on a scheduled passenger flight from Daegu to Shanghai Pudong failed to follow the marked taxiway centreline when taxiing for departure in normal daylight visibility and a wing tip impacted an adjacent building causing minor damage to both building and aircraft. None of the 166 occupants were injured.)
  • B772 / A321, London Heathrow UK, 2007 (GND HF) (On 27 July 2007, a British Airways Boeing 777-200ER collided, during pushback, with a stationary Airbus A321-200. The A321 was awaiting activation of the electronic Stand Entry Guidance (SEG) and expecting entry to its designated gate.)
  • B738/A321, Prague Czech Republic, 2010 (GND HF) (On 18 June 2010 a Sun Express Boeing 737-800 taxiing for a full length daylight departure from runway 06 at Prague was in collision with an Airbus 321 which was waiting on a link taxiway leading to an intermediate take off position on the same runway. The aircraft sustained damage to their right winglet and left horizontal stabiliser respectively and both needed subsequent repair before being released to service.)
  • B744, Paris CDG France, 2003 (GND HF) (On 18 January 2003, a Boeing 747-400F being operated by Singapore Airlines Cargo on a scheduled cargo flight from Paris CDG to Dubai taxied for departure in darkness and fog with visibility less than 100 metres in places and the right wing was in collision with a stationary and unoccupied ground de/anti icing vehicle without the awareness of either the flight crew or anybody else at the time. Significant damage occurred to the de icing vehicle and the aircraft was slightly damaged. The vehicle damage was not discovered until almost two hours later and the aircraft involved was not identified until it arrived in Dubai where the damage was observed and the authorities at Paris CDG advised.)
  • B744 / A321, London Heathrow UK, 2004 (GND HF) (On 23 March 2004, an out of service British Airways Boeing 747-400, under tow passed behind a stationary Airbus A321-200 being operated by Irish Airline Aer Lingus on a departing scheduled passenger service in good daylight visibility and the wing tip of the 747 impacted and seriously damaged the rudder of the A321. The aircraft under tow was cleared for the towing movement and the A321 was holding position in accordance with clearance. The towing team were not aware of the collision and initially, there was some doubt in the A321 flight deck about the cause of a ‘shudder’ felt when the impact occurred but the cabin crew of the A321 had felt the impact shudder and upon noticing the nose of the 747 appearing concluded that it had struck their aircraft. Then the First Officer saw the damaged wing tip of the 747 and informed ATC about the possible impact. Later another aircraft, positioned behind the A321, confirmed the rudder damage. At the time of the collision, the two aircraft involved were on different ATC frequencies.)
  • … further results


Related Articles

For all accident reports held on SKYbrary, see the main section on Accident Reports.